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Current Graduate Students

  • Adeoye, Alexandra

    Ph.D. Student

    Alexandra Adeoye is from Abuja, Nigeria, West Africa. She moved to the U.S. after high school to continue her education. She obtained her Bachelor's degree in Biochemistry from Harding University, Searcy, Arkansas, in 2018 and her Master's degree in Forensic and Investigative Science from WVU in 2022. She is pursuing her PhD in Forensic Science as a student in Dr. Jackson's research group. Her research involves developing and applying the novel Expert Algorithm for Substance Identification (EASI) to emerging synthetic drugs to combat the opioid crisis. Alex's career goals include working at a research-based institution as a forensic chemist and eventually transitioning to academia.

  • Alexander, Lauryn

    Ph.D. Student

    Lauryn Alexander is a second year doctoral student working under Dr. Tatiana Trejos. Her research focuses on strengthening the interpretation of glass and paint evidence through the study of random frequency of occurrence and analytical information. Lauryn is also a Ruby Distinguished Doctoral Fellow from the incoming class of Fall 2019. Lauryn graduated from Hampton University as the top student in her program while earning a B.S. in Chemistry with a concentration in Forensics, and a minor in Spanish. During her undergraduate career, Lauryn participated in multiple research internships, including the Syracuse Biomaterials Institute under Dr. James Henderson in 2016, and the University of California's Historically Black College or University Initiative under Dr. Brian Wong in 2017 and Dr. Eric Potma in 2018. Lauryn also was involved in on-campus research from 2016 to 2018 under Dr. Brandy Young-Gqamana. Her research projects have included creating shape memory polymer temperature sensors, corneal structural modification using electrochemical therapy on rabbit models, dark field microscopy for the use of gold thin films for surface biosensing, as well as using nanoparticles to detect trace quantities of melamine in milk. Lauryn has presented her research at multiple symposiums, as well as the ACS Regional Meeting in November 2017.

  • Alfonso, Eleen

    Eleen Alfonso is a second-year Master's student originally from Orlando, FL. She earned her Bachelor of Science degree in Forensic & Investigative Science with an Examiner Emphasis from West Virginia University in 2020. Currently, Eleen works in Dr. Keith Morris’s research group, focusing on the solvability factors contributing to cold case closures. During her graduate studies, Eleen completed an internship with the Major Crimes Division, Cold Case Squad of Prince George's County Police Department. She is currently a graduate teaching assistant for classes including Crime Scene Investigation, Forensic Photography, and Bloodstain Pattern Analysis.

  • Andrews, Zachary

    Ph.D. Student

    Zachary Andrews is pursuing a Master of Science degree in Forensic & Investigative Science at West Virginia University. Originally from Huntington, WV, Zachary earned his Bachelor of Science degree in Forensic & Investigative Science with an emphasis in Forensic Examination from WVU in 2020. He is currently a Graduate Teaching Assistant in the FIS Department, where he has instructed the Trace Evidence Examination, Court Testimony, and Law & Evidence courses. Zachary is a member of Dr. Tatiana Trejos’ research group, where he studies the validity and reliability of textile and paper fracture characteristics in forensic comparative analysis. He has presented his research at several scientific conferences. Zachary also serves with several WVU professors on an international team tasked with strengthening forensic science practices in Costa Rica’s Judicial Investigations Department.

  • Bodnar, Sara

    Ph.D. Student

    Sara Bodnar is a PhD student hailing from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. She holds a BS in Biology with a specialization in forensics from Ohio's Bowling Green State University. She graduated from WVU with her Master's in Forensic and Investigative Science in May of 2022 on her research involving mitochondrial DNA heteroplasmy in hair. Sara works as a Graduate Teaching Assistant for the FIS Department and has taught courses relating to forensic biology, gravesite forensics, biological evidence, and introduction to forensic science. She works under Dr. Iyengar, and her current research focuses on using the Verogen MiSeq FGxTM Sequencing System to process trace DNA swabbed from both treated fingerprints and objects handled by multiple people.

  • Boyd, Madison

    MS Student

    Madison Boyd is a first-year Masters student from Goldsboro, North Carolina. She received a B.S. in Forensic and Investigative Science with an examiner emphasis from West Virginia University in 2020. During her undergraduate career, Madison took part in a crime scene investigation internship with the Raleigh City-County Bureau of Investigation (CCBI). She is currently working under the guidance of Dr. Keith Morris to pursue research relating to the spatial origin of striations on fired projectiles. She is also currently a graduate teaching assistant for classes including Crime Scene Investigation, Forensic Firearms Examination, and Bloodstain Pattern Analysis.

  • Brady, Samantha

    Samantha Brady is a Master’s student from Rocky Hill, Connecticut. She received her Bachelors of Science in Forensic and Investigative Science with an emphasis in Forensic Examination from West Virginia University in 2021. She is currently employed as a Graduate Teaching Assistant for the Biology Department where she instructs two sections of the Principles of Biology course. Samantha has been a member of Dr. Jacqueline Speir’s research group since 2019. This group focuses largely on footwear impression examination, and Samantha is currently performing research to describe the expected range in variation that exists between high-quality test impressions created under varying circumstances.

  • Kourtney Dalzell

    Ph.D. Student

    Kourtney Dalzell is a master’s student in the Forensic and Investigative Science Program at West Virginia University. She received her Bachelor of Science in Forensic Chemistry with a minor in Sociology from West Virginia University in 2020. Kourtney has been with the Arroyo research group since 2019 and currently works as a graduate research assistant in the laboratory. Her research is focused on electrochemical and spectroscopic methods for the detection of inorganic and organic gunshot residues in forensic investigations.

  • Franklin, Veronica

    PhD Student

    Veronica Franklin is a doctoral student in the Forensic and Investigative Science department at West Virginia University (WVU) with a primary research focus on subclass characteristics found on spent cartridge cases in firearms examination. Before WVU, she received her B.A. degree in Biology with minors in Chemistry and Criminology from the University of Northern Iowa in 2017. Veronica received her Master of Science in Forensic and Investigative Science in 2019 after completing her thesis entitled “Modeling Movement of Criminals through Burglary Scenes”. Currently, Veronica is a Graduate Teaching Assistant with the Forensic and Investigative Science department. She has assisted with courses in the subjects of crime scene investigation, forensic photography, latent fingerprint examination, and trace evidence examination at the undergraduate and graduate level.

  • Galvez, Isabel

    MS Student

    Isabel Gálvez is originally from Cali, Colombia where she earned her B.S in Chemistry with a focus on Biochemistry at Icesi University. During her undergraduate career she did an internship at the National Institute of Legal Medicine and Forensic Science at the Narcotics laboratory, where she performed a variety of analyses for the identification and quantification of drugs. Currently, she is a first year Master’s student at WVU in Dr. Jackson’s research group. She is also a graduate teaching assistant at the department of Forensic and Investigative Sciences.

  • Hacker, Alia

    MS Student

    Alia is originally from Virginia Beach, VA and graduated from George Mason University in 2019 with a Bachelor of Science degree in Chemistry and a minor in Forensic Science. Currently, she is a third-year Master’s student at WVU in the Forensic and Investigative Sciences program. She works as a graduate assistant for the KARM department at the downtown library. She also conducts research in Dr. Jackson’s lab on the mass spectral characterization of emerging drugs of abuse. Her future career goal is to work in a crime lab as a forensic chemist analyzing either arson and explosives residue or controlled substances. Additionally, she would also like to help the innocence project in some capacity to continue to exonerate prisoners who have been wrongfully convicted.

  • Hamilton, James

    PhD Student

    James Hamilton is a third year Ph.D. student in the Department of Forensic and Investigative Science at West Virginia University. He received his B.S in Forensic and Investigative Science with minors in Biology and Sociology in 2015 and his M.S in Forensic and Investigative Science in 2017. His research interests include the development and comparison of breech face and firing pin impressions on a fired cartridge case, internal ballistics, pressure measurement systems, and finite element analysis. He is currently a graduate research assistant in the Department of Forensic and Investigative Science.

  • Hester, Sarah

    MS Student

    Sarah Hester is a first-year Master's student from Cleveland, Ohio. She graduated in 2020 from Seton Hill University (Greensburg, PA) with a Bachelor of Science with Honors in Forensic Science and a minor in Computer Forensics. Sarah currently works as a Graduate Teaching Assistant for the Forensic and Investigative Science Department at WVU. She is doing research under Dr. Keith Morris involving the forensic aspects of genetic genealogy.

  • Leon-Carrillo, Giuliana

    PhD Student

    Giuliana Leon-Carrillo is a second year Ph. D. student in the Morris Research Group, she is currently working on the statistical evaluation of evidence in cold cases. She earned her bachelor degree in Biological Chemistry from the University of Sonora in Mexico. She has two graduate degrees, a Master of Sciences in Molecular Biomedicine from the National Polytechnic Institute in Mexico City, and an Erasmus Mundus Master of Sciences in Forensic Sciences, a joined program from Spain, Portugal and the United Kingdom. Giuliana has completed many workshops, and she has worked as an analyst in an Environmental Accredited Laboratory in her hometown in Sonora, Mexico, and as a Forensic Chemist and as a Crime Scene Investigator in the General Ministry of Justice of the State of Sonora. She has also been a member of the Chartered Society of Forensic Science and the Royal Society of Chemistry. Currently she is working as a Teaching Assistant in the Sociology and Anthropology Department of West Virginia University, where also has gained teaching experience in the Forensic and Investigative Science and Biology Departments.

  • Lin, En Tni (Lily)

    PhD Student

    En Tni (Lily) Lin is originally from Taipei, Taiwan where she earned her B.S. degree in Chemistry at National Taiwan Normal University. After coming to the United States, she attended John Jay College of Criminal Justice (CUNY) to pursue an M.S. degree in Forensic Science. Her thesis research concerned the effects on identification error rates due to subclass characteristics with respect to 3D microscope imaged land engraved areas (LEAs) on bullets. Lily received her M.S. degree with double tracks in criminalistics and forensic toxicology. Currently, Lily is a Ph.D. student in Forensic & Investigative Science at West Virginia University and works as a Teaching Assistant for the microscopy course. Her research focus is on footwear evidence image quality assessment using subjective human raters and objective image feature-based metrics. The goal of her research is developing quantitative tools for footwear image quality and understanding correlations between quality and image factors.

  • Maney, Erica

    Ph.D. Student

    Erica earned her Bachelor of Arts degree in Biochemistry with minors in Biology, Mathematics, and Spanish from Duquesne University in 2019. She remained at Duquesne University for the following year, earning her Master of Science in Forensic Science in Law in 2020. Currently, Erica is a first year PhD student and a Provost Fellow in the Department of Forensic and Investigative Science at WVU. She works in Dr. Glen Jackson’s research group, focusing on the forensic applications of isotope ratio mass spectrometry.

  • McMillen, Hannah

    Hannah McMillen is from Charles County, MD and is a first-year Forensic & Investigative Science Master of Science student at West Virginia University. Hannah earned her Bachelor of Science degree in Forensic Chemistry from WVU in May 2022. She is currently a Graduate Teaching Assistant in the Biology Department for the introductory biology laboratory course, BIOL 115L. Hannah is a member of Dr. Glen P. Jackson’s research group, where she will be continuing research related to the Arson research she began in his group during her 2021 summer internship. Hannah was able to present her undergraduate research at the American Academy of Forensic Science (AAFS) conference in February 2022. She is the treasurer of the new forensic science honors fraternity (Delta Delta Epsilon), a member of the FIS club, and a member of the WVU swim club.

  • Poulos, Christopher

    Chris is from Downingtown, Pennsylvania and earned his Bachelor of Science degree in Forensic Chemistry from WVU in 2021. He is currently a second year graduate student pursuing a Master of Science degree in Forensic and Investigative Science. Chris is a member of Dr. Jackson's research group and his research focuses on the structural characterization of novel psychoactive substances by tandem mass spectrometry.

  • Poulton, Baillie

    Baillie Poulton is a second-year master’s student from Yardley, PA. She received her Bachelor of Science degree in Forensic and Investigative Science with an examiner emphasis from West Virginia University in 2021. She also completed a minor in Sociology. Baillie currently works as a graduate research assistant in the department. She has helped in the following classes: latent fingerprints, forensic photography, firearms, social relations of forensic and law professionals, and the first-year seminar for incoming freshmen. Baillie is in Dr. Keith Morris’ research group. Her research is focused on bullet trajectory determination with the use of an algorithm. She will be making these determinations with the help of participant angle measurements from target surfaces, as well as elevation data, muzzle velocity estimations, and departure angle estimations.

  • Prusinowski, Meghan

    Ph.D. Student

    Meghan earned a bachelor’s degree in chemistry from SUNY Geneseo (New York) in 2017, and a MS degree in Forensic Science from WVU in 2019. She is currently working on her PhD in Forensic Science under Dr. Tatiana Trejos. She has previously worked as a teaching assistant for several FIS courses, including arson and explosive analysis, seized drugs, forensic chemical analysis, and trace evidence examination. She currently works as a graduate research assistant funded by a NIJ grant. Meghan’s dissertation and primary research focuses on developing standard and quantitative methods for the analysis of physical fits of various trace materials, including polymers, textiles, and glass. In addition, her research interests include analyzing polymer materials using different spectrochemical techniques including Scanning Electron Microscopy Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (SEM-EDS), X-ray Fluorescence (XRF), and Laser Ablation Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). She has published her research in Forensic Chemistry and Forensic Science International and has presented work at multiple conferences. Meghan currently is a member of the NIST-OSAC Trace Materials Subcommittee, working on documents as part of several task groups. She is also a student affiliate member of the American Academy of Forensic Sciences (AAFS) and the American Society of Trace Evidence Examiners (ASTEE).

  • Rupert, Katrina

    MS Student

    Katrina Rupert is a current second-year Masters student and, being a US Air Force brat, is most recently located out of Northern Virginia. She earned her Bachelor of Science in Forensic & Investigative Science with areas of emphasis in Forensic Examination and Forensic Biology as well as two minors in biology and history from West Virginia University in May 2019. Throughout undergrad, Katrina conducted three years of trace evidence research under the supervision of Dr. Tatiana Trejos which culminated in numerous presentations at various conferences as well as a publication on the transfer and persistence of glass in 2018. Katrina has worked as a graduate teaching assistant (GTA) for the Biology Department, teaching The Living Cell laboratory (BIOL 220). She currently works as a GTA for the Forensic & Investigative Science Department and has taught Biological Evidence for Forensic Examiners (FIS 305), Quality Assurance (FIS 480), Biology of the Grace (FIS 493), Crime Scene Investigation Overview (FIS 202), and Bloodstain Pattern Analysis (FIS 409). This semester, Katrina is teaching Bloodstain Pattern Analysis and Crime Scene Investigation Overview again as well as Trace Evidence Examinations lecture and laboratory (FIS 414/416). As for her graduate research, Katrina works in Tina Moroose’s forensic biology laboratory and is conducting experiments focused on the degradation relationship between latent prints and touch DNA exposed to various environmental variables.

  • Smale, Alyssa

    Ph.D. Student

    Alyssa is a Ph.D. student in the Department of Forensic and Investigative Science at WVU. She holds a Bachelor’s degree in Chemistry from Lebanon Valley College (2018) and a Master’s degree in Forensic Science from Penn State University (2020). She is a member of Dr. Speir’s research group, and her research focuses on the estimation of random match probability in footwear evidence. Alyssa is a graduate teaching assistant for the microscopy course.

  • Smith,Coral

    Ph.D. Student

    Coral is a first year Masters student from Long Island, New York. She graduated from Alfred State College of Technology in 2019 with a Bachelor of Science Degree in Forensic Science Technology, and Associate of Applied Sciences in Biological Sciences and an Associate of Science in Criminal Justice. Currently, she works as a Graduate Teaching Assistant for the Biology Department instructing laboratory sections for Principles of Biology and Introduction to Physiology. Coral is a member of Tina Moroose’s research group planning her study of touch DNA and direct PCR.

  • Thornton, Jessica

    Jessica earned her Bachelors of Science in Forensic Science with a minor in Strategic Intelligence from Liberty University in May 2021. Her undergraduate research on “Changes in the Microbiome at the Onset and End of Decomposition” was recently published in the Journal of Biotechnology and Bioinformatics Research. Upon completion of her undergraduate degree, she transferred to WVU to pursue her Masters of Science in Forensic and Investigative Science. Currently, Jessica is a second year master’s student in Tina Moroose’s lab, and her research focuses on characterizing the cellular and cell-free fractions of touch DNA deposits, as well as using interdisciplinary approaches, such as ATR-FTIR, to evaluate DNA binding to metal in attempt to improve sample recovery.

  • Trimble, Kayla

    MS Student

    Kayla Trimble is a second-year Master’s student from Montoursville, Pennsylvania. She earned her Bachelor of Science degree in Forensic and Investigative Science with a biology and examiner emphasis from West Virginia University in May of 2021. During her undergraduate career, Kayla interned with the Virginia Beach Police Department’s Forensic Services Unit. She is currently working under the guidance of Dr. Keith Morris to pursue research relating to the analysis of the affect of rate of fire on the reproducibility of breech face impressions. She is also currently a graduate teaching assistant for the biology department where she teaches two sections of the Principles of Biology lab course.