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Overview and General Information

WVU’s internship program in the department of Forensic and Investigative Sciences is the largest in the United States. For most students, the internship experience is the gateway to their first job. Students often receive job offers from their internship site as soon as they have completed their degree. At the very least, the internship supervisor provides an invaluable first professional reference.The internship program at WVU is coordinated by Robert O'Brien, but is ultimately overseen by department chair Suzanne Bell.

Full-time students must complete their internship in the summer between their junior and senior year. Exceptions to this rule must be approved, in writing, by the chair of the department. 

A successful internship is a three-way partnership. The department will work with you to find a site that complements your interests. We will assist with all paperwork and will work with sites to ensure that they provide you with a meaningful experience. The internship sites and coordinators will show you the real world of forensic and investigative science. However, the single most important factor in a successful internship is YOU. Take the initiative from the start, help find a site, work with the coordinators to make it happen, and make all required deadlines and meetings. What is expected of you here is no less than will be expected of you when you take your first job; in fact, the internship is your first forensic job. Make sure to approach it that way.

Students should check with their advisors to ascertain that they have completed all of the necessary course pre-requisites. Enrollment does not guarantee admittance or placement. Decisions regarding placement are made in the formal application process. Internships such as volunteer work outside the oversight of the department cannot substitute for the required internship hours. Any and all internships MUST be approved by the department.