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Bachelor of Science in Forensic and Investigative Science

Students in the Department of Forensic and Investigative Science can choose which emphasis of study best fits their career interests – forensic examiner, forensic biology or forensic chemistry. Each area of emphasis provides great preparation for graduate studies or professional programs such as dental, medical, and law school.

Forensic Examiner

Suggested dual majors: Forensic Chemistry, Forensic Biology, Anthropology

This emphasis prepares students for positions as crime scene analysts, latent fingerprint examiners, forensic photographers, evidence technicians, investigators, and law enforcement officers and agents. Working conditions are typically field and/or office-based rather than laboratory-based. Crime scene analysts are often part of major crime scene squads that collect and document evidence, but they rarely participate in the scientific examination of the evidence in the laboratory.

Forensic Biology

Suggested dual major: B.S. Biology                

This emphasis prepares students for positions in forensic labs as DNA analysts. It is well suited as a pre-professional program and as excellent preparation for graduate work in biological disciplines. Forensic DNA work is a laboratory-based profession with employment opportunities in local, state, federal, and private laboratories. Forensic biologists typically do not do crime scene work on a routine basis, but may occasionally be called to a scene.

Forensic Chemistry

Suggested dual majors: B.S. Chemistry, B.A. Chemistry, B.A. Chemistry/Biochemistry

The forensic chemistry emphasis prepares students for positions in forensic labs as forensic chemists, arson analyst and investigators, forensic toxicologists, and trace evidence examiners. Like the biology track, it too is well-suited as a pre-professional program and as excellent preparation for graduate work in chemical disciplines. Forensic chemistry work is a laboratory-based profession with employment opportunities in local, state, federal, and private laboratories. Forensic chemists typically do not do crime scene work on a routine basis, but may occasionally be called to a scene.